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Jaguar Magazine #08

  • Text
  • Salvador
  • Materials
  • Morris
  • Cultural
  • Ahmed
  • Mestre
  • Arts
  • Galway
  • Capoeira
  • Jaguar
In this issue, we explore the art of creativity from the Brazilian masters who devised the graceful art of Capoeira, to the Irish artists mixing new culture with old. You will also discover the creative line that links Victorian wallpaper to the iPhone. While the multi-talented actor and performer, Riz Ahmed, explains why it is the right time to reveal his true self to the world.

Trends THE GAME OF THE

Trends THE GAME OF THE NAME Ever wondered how products get their names? We explore the art and science of nomenclature Story Luke Ponsford Illustration Ulla Puggaard “ Finding a single, natural word name is now much more challenging” Brand names are everywhere, and the successful ones are part of our everyday vocabulary. But how are they created, and what’s the formula for their success? Creating a catchy, lucrative name is no easy task. There’s no magic formula or established methodology in coming up with the next Google, Nike or Starbucks. The fi rst step in naming a product or company is to study and absorb as much as possible about the product or brand that is being named. Inspiration can come from anywhere. “Songs, literature, subject glossaries, history and astronomy are all game,” explains Margaret Wolfson, Founder and Creative Director of New Yorkbased brand naming consultancy River + Wolf. Clients are also asked how they want their name to sound. Should it be friendly? Should it be masculine or feminine? Should it sound hard-edged or scientifi c? “A lot of tech companies want scientifi c, futuristic monikers, so naming companies frequently experiment with Ks and Xs. An X, for example, visually looks quite ‘futurey’, scientifi c and mathematical,” explains Laurel Sutton, co-founder of San Francisco-based brand naming agency Catchword. Visual requirements and character limits need to be taken into account. Names need to be memorable, understandable, easy to spell, shorter rather than longer, and graphically pleasing. Some jobs, however, can be more straightforward than others. A conversation with new clients, a startup software company, informed Sutton’s creative direction. “The founders talked about their ethics and their interest in yoga as something that kept them grounded,” Sutton explains. “They wanted to infuse those values into their company.” So, Catchword came up with the name ‘asana’– the Sanskrit word for ‘yoga pose’. “The name worked on a number of levels,” says Sutton. “Firstly, it’s a beautiful word. It’s feminine, it fl ows effortlessly, and there are no unsightly descenders or ascenders – like Ds or Ps – to ruin the visual balance. Secondly, it tells a story. In yoga you’re focused, you’re ready for the next thing, and that’s what Asana software is supposed to be all about. The name just suited the product really well.” But fi nding that perfect name can be just the start of the journey. Screening for trademark confl icts is an onerous part of the work. “Given the explosion of companies and products in recent years, fi nding a single, natural word name without high trademark risks has become much more challenging,” says Wolfson. When it comes to naming cars – specifi cally Jaguars – David Browne, Product Marketing Director and head of the company’s Naming Committee, faces similar challenges. “It’s an increasingly diffi cult thing to do because of all the existing trademarks that are already in place,” he explains. “You also have to keep in mind cultural and language differences, as names have to work in all countries around the world.” Industry trends move with the times. “Traditionally many businesses – cars, jewellery and perfume producers are just three examples – were named after the people who started them,” says Sutton. “But recently there’s been a more interesting take. Take the online-only banking and budgeting apps that use friendly ‘people’ names like Dave, Marcus or Frank. They appeal to younger Millennial types who don’t have any long-term association with big corporations, and are in fact quite mistrustful of them. They’re looking for smaller startup businesses, who they feel they can trust.” Browne, however, doesn’t have to stick only to the zeitgeist. “Jaguar has such a strong legacy built over time,” he says. “People buy into some very emotive historical reasons when they buy one of our cars. When we were naming our range of SUVs, we went back to that history. Our ‘Grace, Space, Pace’ slogan from the 1960s still rings true about what a Jaguar should be, and our SUVs fit in with that saying.” Indeed, the E-, F- and I-PACE are further examples of names that suit. Ultimately, though, a great name only acts as the garnish on top of a truly successful brand. “A good name can enhance a quality product or company, but it can’t save a bad one,” says Wolfson. “Similarly, a bad name isn’t necessarily a smackdown for a strong product or company. One thing is for sure – when a strong name is developed for a strong company or product, the rubber really meets the road.” J 70 / Jaguar Magazine Jaguar Magazine / 71

 

JAGUAR MAGAZINE

 

Jaguar Magazine celebrates creativity in all its forms, with exclusive features that inspire sensory excitement, from beautiful design to cutting-edge technology.

In this issue, we explore the art of creativity from the Brazilian masters who devised the graceful art of Capoeira, to the Irish artists mixing new culture with old. You will also discover the creative line that links Victorian wallpaper to the iPhone. While the multi-talented actor and performer, Riz Ahmed, explains why it is the right time to reveal his true self to the world.

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