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THE JAGUAR #05

  • Text
  • Jaguar
  • Racing
  • Formula
  • Waymo
  • Thrill
  • Motorsport
  • Engineers
  • Engineering
Discover a different side to Eva Green | Will your next taxi be a self-driven Jaguar I-PACE? | What it takes to break a lap record at the  Nürburgring Nordschleife | The petrolheads racing in Jaguar’s new all-electric race series | Up close with the latest special edition of the XE and XF: the 300 SPORT

LICENCE T O THRILL

LICENCE T O THRILL THRILLS ARE AMONG THE MOST POWERFUL EMOTIONS HUMANS CAN EXPERIENCE. BUT WHILE THE PAYOFF MIGHT BE QUICK AND UNEXPECTED, THERE IS A SURPRISING AMOUNT OF DELIBERA- TION BEHIND THE CREATION OF THRILLING MOMENTS. WE MEET THREE INDIVIDUALS WHO ENGINEER SUCH MOMENTS, AND LEARN HOW DECADES OF EXPERIENCE AND PAINSTAKING PLANNING ENABLE THEM TO CRAFT UNIQUE JOURNEYS OF ADRENALINE AND SURPRISE STORY: Geoff Poulton PHOTOGRAPHY: Roderick Aichinger 58 THE JAGUAR

HERMANN TILKE F1 CIRCUIT DESIGNER When Hermann Tilke was 18, he borrowed his mother’s car. But it wasn’t to visit a friend or go to the cinema. “I put a roll cage inside it and went hill racing,” he says. “She wasn’t too happy when she found out!” It was a humble beginning for a man who has gone on to become one of motorsport’s most influential figures. Tilke might not have made it to the very top as a driver – “I was a good amateur, but not pro level” – but he is the undoubted king of racetrack design, with more than 75 circuits to his name. Almost every track on the current Formula One calendar has been built or modified by the German and his team at Tilke Engineers & Architects. “With a little input from Bernie Ecclestone,” he adds with a smile. That Tilke has managed to combine a passion for motorsport with his love of design and construction is pure coincidence, he says. After studying, he worked as a civil engineer: “A good job, but I didn’t have enough free time to go racing.” So Tilke quit and set up his own engineering consultancy. “I had contacts at the Nürburgring and they offered me my first contract – a 20-metre service road. Who would have thought it would end up like this?” he says, glancing around his office at 3D-printed racetrack models and photos of circuits from Texas to Malaysia. First stop on any new project is a site inspection to assess factors like topography, climate and soil quality. When Tilke and his team of designers, engineers and architects begin sketching, it’s never a blank canvas, though; geographical restrictions and safety regulations shape their work. “I like elevation. When a corner goes over a hill, it behaves completely differently to the flat. It’s much more difficult to drive at high speed. But we have to work with what we have.” With a brief that often includes a concept for the entire surrounding infrastructure, from grandstands to restaurants, Tilke’s aim is to create a grand sporting arena. From initial designs to first race, the process typically takes around three years. “The track should maximise the challenges for drivers and thrill spectators,” he says. Turn eight at Tilke’s Istanbul Park track, for example, is considered to be one of the most exhilarating ever built, a triple-apex taken flat out at 170mph for eight seconds; turn one at his Circuit of the Americas has seen spectacular overtaking since its introduction in 2012. But he also has his critics. Certain F1 pundits and fans have labelled his tracks boring, with mistakes left unpunished by generous run-off areas. “This isn’t the 1960s,” he retorts. “Safety regulations are much stricter. You can’t have barriers next to the road. And these circuits aren’t just for Formula One – what about the motorbike riders? What’s safe for a car isn’t necessarily safe for them.” Evolution is important, he insists. “Look at Formula E – it sounds different, but so what? Ultimately, racing is racing. It doesn’t matter what it is, you just have to be as fast as possible.” Tilke himself still raced competitively until just a decade ago, including a 24-hour race at the Nürburgring. Now 63, his own appetite for speed may have lessened a little, but his son Carsten, also a partner in the business, has picked up the baton. “We drove together in a four-hour race in Moscow once; he was faster than me. Watching him race is more thrilling than anything else.” THE JAGUAR 59

 

JAGUAR

THE JAGUAR #05

 

THE JAGUAR magazine celebrates the art of performance with exclusive features that inspire sensory excitement, from dynamic driving to seductive design and cutting-edge technology.

Led by an exclusive and insightful interview with unconventional actor and Jaguar campaign star Eva Green, this issue is full of Jaguar spirit. See the Jaguar XE 300 SPORT and XE SV Project 8 unleashed on the volcanic slopes of Sicily, go behind the scenes of setting two world records, look ahead to the Jaguar I-PACE eTROPHY Championship season debut, learn the secrets of thrill-making from three renowned proponents of the art, and much more.

The Library

THE JAGUAR #05
THE JAGUAR #04
The JAGUAR #03
The Jaguar #02
THE JAGUAR #01
The Blockbuster Issue

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